mini review: ‘The Great Gatsby’ by F. Scott Fitzgerald

4 stars

Although it took me a ridiculous amount of time to get through this short book, and despite not loving it at the beginning, this still deserves 4 stars for me. As when I eventually finished this charming read, I wanted more. Some books just speak for themselves as to why they are regarded as classics.

The Great Gatsby was just such a suave and sophisticated depiction of this age. Decadent and luxurious but at the same time corrupt, and not without its flaws. Jay Gatsby is the living embodiment of the American Dream, becoming something from a whole lot of nothing. He’s charming, elusive, intelligent and giving – but he isn’t really happy. Money really can’t buy everything, huh? But evidently he think’s it can buy him back his beloved Daisy, and that proves to be his biggest mistake.

I’m not sure what else to say about this novel without giving much of the plot away, which I don’t really want to do. I will say that I genuinely went into this read not knowing anything about it (not sure how I avoided that one), except from the established overall feeling of indulgent glitz and glamour, and I was pleasantly surprised by the turns it took. I got more and more invested in the characters and the story the more I read.

Still, I have mixed feelings towards Gatsby. Did he just evolve into a spoilt little rich boy, not being able to cope when not getting his way? Or was he blinded by love, or infatuation as some may see it, not deserving his unfortunate end?

In conclusion, I really enjoyed the build up and climax of this novel, it’s storyline as a whole, and Fitzgerald’s writing. I took pleasure in hearing the story unfold through Nick Carraway’s often cynical narration. I’ve been holding out on watching the film until I read the novel, so three guesses what I’m about to do now?

Thanks for reading!

sign off heartJess

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